Tranisitions

Personal Finance and Personal Development, from one 30-something to another

Semi-retirement

So, check this out. I don’t know about you, but I’ve got a case of wanderlust that keeps getting in the way of me truly focusing on my 9 to 5. I’d much rather be hanging out in Costa Rica or seeing the sights in old Europe than watching JD Jr. grow up in pictures on my desk. There are plenty of companies out there today that offer remote working arrangements (Best Buy has everyone in their corporate headquarters on a flex time program, what they call ROWE, or Results Oriented Work Environment), where all you really need are a laptop and a wifi connection. Teleconferencing can work from anywhere in the world, even the most remote locations (if you have a sat phone). Why do we need to be tethered to a desk in order to prove our productivity?  Granted, this article is aimed at folks with more maturity and time in the workforce than I have, but still…

Tim Ferriss, in his book, The 4 Hour Work Week, talks a lot about strategies for liberating yourself from the 9-5, allowing you to work on your terms wherever you want to. Be honest: how much time do you really waste sitting at a desk, reading email, or being distracted by conversations going on around you, or sitting in meetings in which you have nothing to add? Maybe you couldn’t get everything done in 4 hours a week, but Tim makes a pretty convincing case through the power of the Pareto Principle (also known as the 80/20 rule: 80% of our results come from 20% of our activity) and Parkinson’s Law (tasks expand in time required to complete to the extent that we allow them to) that we could get our stuff done a lot more efficiently than we do without any loss of effectiveness. I’m not sure I totally agree with everything he says about how to go about freeing yourself from a scheduled working arrangement, but the core nuggets relating to freedom from a schedule certainly are appropriate.

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21 June, 2007 Posted by | active retirement | Leave a comment